Still quantifying ourselves?

daytumapp

Didn’t realise I’d been away from Daytum for so long.

For those that don’t know, and why should you, bloody hell, Daytum was part of a trend on the web some time back for personal data tracking, the ‘quantified self’. Here’s a post from Wired about it, from 2009:

Know Thyself: Tracking Every Facet of Life, from Sleep to Mood to Pain, 24/7/365
Numbers are making their way into the smallest crevices of our lives. We have pedometers in the soles of our shoes and phones that can post our location as we move around town. We can tweet what we eat into a database and subscribe to Web services that track our finances. There are sites and programs for monitoring mood, pain, blood sugar, blood pressure, heart rate, cognitive alacrity, menstruation, and prayers. … All this might once have seemed like a nightmare … But two years ago, my fellow Wired writer Kevin Kelly and I noticed that many of our acquaintances were beginning to do this terrible thing to themselves, finding clever ways to extract streams of numbers from ordinary human activities.

Daytum, developed by Nicholas Feltron (of the well known Feltron reports) and Ryan Case, Daytum allows you to easily capture and categorise small bits of information, and then present these in quite interesting, visual ways with the aim of providing a little insight into how we live our lives. For a while, all the way back in 2009, I was tracking how much coffee I got through, what I was reading, which were my favourite ties, that kind of thing.

I don’t know what made me think of Daytum again, but I thought I’d catch up with it again.

Its blog, however, ends with this post from April 11:

Moving West
We’re thrilled to announce today that we just started a new phase of our careers: we’ve moved to California to join the product design team at Facebook.

and the last tweet from the @daytum Twitter account is:

Doesn’t bode well, but then, just the other week coincidentally, this one from founder Nicholas Feltron:

So perhaps there might be some life left in it yet?

And I’ve forgotten all about your.flowingdata.com too. But that, like Daytum and much of the quantifying self scene, seems to have gone a little quiet.

Speaking of punctuation

Following on from that punctuation post just then, here are a few more:

andorpersand

I’m finding the dictation feature on my new phone very handy, but even though it supports a whole range of spoken punctuation marks and “new line” and “all caps” and all that, it seems to be struggling with Andorpersand, Hedera and Love Point. Shame.

A short history of punctuation

Via The Browser, a quick dash through the history of punctuation.

“Writing in ancient Greece was broken by neither marks nor spaces. Lines of closely-packed letters ran left to right across the page and back again like a farmer ploughing a field. The sole aid to the reader was the paragraphos, a simple horizontal stroke in the margin that indicated something of interest on the corresponding line. It was up to the reader to work out what, exactly, had been highlighted in this fashion”

Maximal meaning in minimal space: the history of punctuation (shadycharacters.co.uk)