Books, future tense

Kindle v Glass, apps v text: the complicated future of books
It’s yet another way that our digital footprint is commercialised, marketed and analysed. Nothing is private anymore. Curling up on the couch with an e-book is not a solitary act but instead a way for corporations to learn about your habits and then sell you items you’ll think you need.

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Despite it all, the book will survive and perhaps thrive, though our understanding of what a book can do and how it relates to the reader must change. Amazon remains a behemoth and yet a recent New Yorker feature on the company painted a picture of multinational disinterest in building a quality collection of books and literary culture (perhaps because they’re too busy selling garden tools, dildos and toys on their website).

How about never?

This cartoon by Bob Mankoff really tickled me. I’ve never seen it before but it turns out it’s a ‘pop culture classic’. Brainpickings reviews the artist’s memoirs of the same name.

Rejection as creative catalyst: a lesson in entrepreneurship from New Yorker Cartoon Editor Bob Mankoff
A tale of finding art in the absurd and entrepreneurial spark in the rejected.

Spinning like lonely stars indeed

Grant Smithies is lost in cyber-space
Here, my friends, is an addiction of the worst possible kind: A scourge on polite society that wastes the body and fries the brain. While seemingly harmless, social media is powerfully habit-forming. Within no time, the user becomes hopelessly hooked on gossip, recycled jokes and pop culture detritus, and begins to crave daily doses of dot-camaraderie with their online “friends” or “followers”. Rather than seeking flesh-and-blood interactions in the physical world, they spin like lonely stars through a vast digital galaxy swirling with trivia, wondering how they might best contribute to the communal pool of inanity.

Oh cheer up #ffs!

This is a long shot

An incredible film — 2,000 cast members, 3 orchestras, 1 camera, 1 continuous shot.

Directed by Alexander Sokurov in 2002, Russian Ark was filmed entirely in the Winter Palace of the Russian State Hermitage Museum using a single 96-minute steadicam shot. It’s a dreamlike reflection of 300 years of Russian history. It could be said the main character in the film is the palace itself, home to the Russian monarchs and to so much history. This could be the ark of the Russian soul, keeping it safe from harm.

The Russian Ark Trailer (2002)
A 19th century French aristocrat, notorious for his scathing memoirs about life in Russia, travels through the Russian State Hermitage Museum and encounters historical figures from the last 200+ years. Entirely filmed in the Winter Palace of the Russian State Hermitage Museum using a single 96-minute Steadicam sequence shot. The film was entered into the 2002 Cannes Film Festival.

In One Breath – Alexander Sokurov’s Russian Ark (Making of)
Behind the scenes documentary on the filming of Russian Ark.

Russian Ark (2002) trivia
The film’s final, hypnotic dance sequence was a recreation of a 1913 gathering which marked the final ball ever held in Csarist Russia. It should be noted that the sequence was filmed in the exact same ballroom that was used in 1913, and that the room had not been used for dancing since that pre-revolutionary time.

The book man with bite

Andrew Wylie advises you “pick the plague!” over Amazon
It’s probably only an urban legend that if you work in publishing, and you die, an apparition of Andrew Wylie floats above you in your final moments of consciousness to judge your contributions to the literary canon. Imagine his face floating just above you in the dark, then his lips moving softly to say, “Nothing you published is worth reading.” Or, “Your list was no better than a third-rate hotel in Cincinnati.” Now imagine him saying it in German.

Rain has fallen, generally cloudy

The changing shape of UK weather: Historic maps show 142 years of rain, sun and wind
Thousands of weather maps throughout the past 142 years have been unearthed showing how fashion and technology have drastically changed the diagrams. The wealth of maps are largely drawn by hand and feature ink notes and tea cup rings as the Met Office did not draw maps on computers until 1981.

rain-has-fallen-1

Dad turns toddler son into CGI superhero

Action Movie Kid: DreamWorks dad Daniel Hashimoto turns toddler son into lightsaber-wielding CGI superhero
A dad has turned his young son into a lightsaber-wielding, telekinesis-mastering pyromaniac on YouTube. His secret? He works as an after effects artists for DreamWorks.

Yes I think we can safely say that all of us dads are more than a little jealous of this guy’s skills.

The Internet Archive

Still can’t get my head around the scale of these things, the numbers involved.

Internet Archive
Internet Archive is a documentary focused on the future of long-term digital storage, the history of the Internet and attempts to preserve its contents on a massive scale.

Via Webmonkey. Don’t know why it makes me think of this though…

The next lego productivity thing?

Bit Planner
The Lego calendar is a wall mounted time planner that we invented for our studio. It’s made entirely of Lego, but if you take a photo of it with a smartphone all of the events and timings will be magically synchronised to an online, digital calendar. It makes the most of the tangibility of physical objects, and the ubiquity of digital platforms.

DNA/How to Stop Worrying and Learn to Love the Internet

For instance, ‘interactivity’ is one of those neologisms that Mr Humphrys likes to dangle between a pair of verbal tweezers, but the reason we suddenly need such a word is that during this century we have for the first time been dominated by non-interactive forms of entertainment: cinema, radio, recorded music and television. Before they came along all entertainment was interactive: theatre, music, sport – the performers and audience were there together, and even a respectfully silent audience exerted a powerful shaping presence on the unfolding of whatever drama they were there for. We didn’t need a special word for interactivity in the same way that we don’t (yet) need a special word for people with only one head.

http://www.douglasadams.com/dna/19990901-00-a.html

Student life is trademarked?

The ridiculous phrases that universities have trademarked

  • ‘First-year experience’ has been trademarked by the University of South Carolina
  • ‘Fast-track MBA’ has been trademarked by Eastern University
  • ‘Be the difference’ has been trademarked by Marquette University
  • ‘Cure violence’ has been trademarked by the University of Illinois
  • ‘Student life’ has been trademarked by Washington University in St. Louis
  • ‘Students with diabetes’ has been trademarked by the University of South Florida
  • ‘One course at a time’ has been trademarked by Cornell College
  • ‘Touched by a nurse’ has been trademarked by the University of Colorado
  • ‘We’re conquering cancer’ has been trademarked by the University of Texas
  • ‘Working toward a world without cancer’ has been trademarked by the University of Kansas Hospital
  • ‘Imagination beyond measure’ has been trademarked by the University of Virginia
  • ‘Tomorrow starts here’ has been trademarked by East Carolina University

How crazy. I’m always very wary of thoughts I may have that follow the “It’s some-seemingly-straightforward-common-sense-aspect-of-modern-life-that’s-probably-lots-more-complicated-than-we-imagine-once-we-understand-the-issues-and-context gone mad!” pattern, but dear me this does sound stupid. First year experience? Student life?

Via Registrarism.

An unhealthy medical market

Why doctors still use pen and paper
This is a generic problem in society. We have lots of information, and we don’t always know what to do with it. Your doctor, your nurse, is not prepared to process the information they already have. It’s already overwhelming. And adding more in will just make it even more anxiety-provoking and overwhelming.

Hadn’t really thought about this point of view before. But surely this is the reason to move more online, not to stop from doing so?

Feedbin’s First Year

RSS is one of the last holdouts of a more open web and it’s been gratifying to see that there’s enough interest in it to sustain some great independent services that care more about the product than eyeballs.

The next time you read somebody declaring the death of RSS, you can just smile to yourself as you mark it as read in your favorite reader and move on to the next article.

http://blog.feedbin.com/2014/03/11/feedbins-first-year/

I’ve been using–and gladly paying for–Feedbin since Google Reader buggered off, and think it’s a great service. Not really sure why RSS isn’t a bigger thing. Just couldn’t cross over into the mainstream, I guess.

Kent Police fined £100K after leaving confidential documents and tapes in disused police station

Kent Police fined £100K after leaving confidential documents and tapes in disused police station
Kent Police must pay a £100,000 fine after a potentially ‘enormous and damaging’ security blunder. It comes after confidential information, including copies of police interview tapes, were left in the basement of the former Gravesend police station.

US universities rethink data storage after hacking incidents

US universities rethink data storage after hacking incidents
Online thieves have increasingly sought sensitive or otherwise valuable data from educational institutions, experts say. Last year alone, breaches included possible exposure of 2.5 million Social Security and bank account numbers associated with an Arizona community college system, 74,000 Social Security numbers of University of Delaware students and staff, and 145,000 applications to Virginia Tech, according to the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse.