Happy GDPR Day!

Remember though, 25 May is just the beginning, not the deadline. Don’t panic.

US sites block users in Europe: Why are they ghosting EU? It’s not you, it’s GDPR
Visitors in the bloc trying to load articles from the Tribune, or stablemates the Los Angeles Times – the fifth-biggest daily – and the Orlando Sentinel are shown the same error message from publisher Tronc.

“Unfortunately, our website is currently unavailable in most European countries,” it reads. “We are engaged on the issue and committed to looking at options that support our full range of digital offerings to the EU market. We continue to identify technical compliance solutions that will provide all readers with our award-winning journalism.”

The finger is pointed at the General Data Protection Regulation, which, although it is only just being enforced today, was adopted on 14 April 2016 – meaning organisations have had more than two years to prepare.

Help, my lightbulbs are dead! How GDPR became bigger than Beyonce
But the potential of huge fines hasn’t been the only reason for GDPR mania. There’s also a growing market of people working in data protection and offering dubious services related to GDPR. In the UK there are more than 100 registered companies with the GDPR acronym in their titles – and the vast majority of these were formed after the regulation was approved in 2016. Their purpose? To offer advice on how companies can get their data in order and create products that can help organise information.

[…]

In a post on LinkedIn, George Parapadakis who formerly worked at IBM, wrote that technology wouldn’t solve GDPR issues. “The nonsense that I read on a daily basis, defies belief,” Parapadakis wrote. Turner adds: “Don’t get me wrong, we’re all in it to pay the mortgage but I think as the panic has increased, there is something of a feeding frenzy of, ’Let’s see how much we can get before the momentum goes out of the market.’” This may have peaked when GDPR became more popular than Beyonce.