Black holes on Earth

You wouldn’t think an exhibition of rejected photographs would be that inspiring. Think again.

Hole punched voids transform rejected photographs from the Great Depression
In an untitled photograph from 1937, a black disc surreally floats upon the subject’s face, obscuring the features hidden beneath the circular void. In another, a black circle hovers next to a tilted house, creating an eerie scene pulled straight from science fiction. At first glance, you might think a contemporary artist had altered the images, drawing jet-black voids as an intervention with photographs from rural Depression-era America. In reality, these images are discarded photographs from a bygone project that produced a pictorial record of American life between 1935-1944.

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Hundreds of thousands of photos were taken for the project and, necessarily, hundreds of thousands were rejected. One that has stood the test of time was Lange’s Migrant Mother from 1936.

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Stryker deployed a specific editing process where himself and his assistants would choose photographs they believed were true to the brief; the other images were rendered unsuitable and punctuated with a hole puncher. These ruthlessly “killed” photographs were left unpublishable. Today the found works appear to have black discs floating upon them, a visual mark of rejection which accidentally focus the viewer’s attention.

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More info on the gallery’s website.

Killed negatives: unseen images of 1930s America
Omitted from the story of this landmark documentary project is the ruthless method of editing Stryker deployed for the final selection. The negative of each rejected image was punctured with a hole puncher; if a print was made the image would feature a black disc, floating surreally over faces and landscapes.

Killed Negatives: Unseen Images of 1930s America

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Author: Terry Madeley

I enjoy reading about art and design, culture, data, education, technology and the web. I'm confused by a lot of it, to be honest.

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