Follow the data

I’m hearing more and more about data ethics. It wasn’t ‘a thing’ before, was it? But it certainly is now. Here’s a very interesting take on it: flow.

The ethics of data flow
In Privacy in Context, Helen Nissenbaum connects data’s mobility to privacy and ethics. For Nissenbaum, the important issue isn’t what data should be private or public, but how data and information flow: what happens to your data, and how it is used. Information flows are central to our expectations of privacy, and respecting those expectations is at the heart of data ethics.

It’s not what they’ve got, but what they do with it that matters.

The infamous Target case, in which Target outed a pregnant teenager by sending ad circulars to her home, is a great example. We all buy things, and when we buy things, we know that data is used—to send bills and to manage inventory, if nothing else. In this case, the surprise was that Target used this customer’s purchase history to identify her as pregnant, and send circulars advertising products for pregnant women and new mothers to her house. The problem isn’t the collection of data, or even its use; the problem is that the advertising comes from, and produces, a different and unexpected data flow. The data that’s flowing isn’t just the feed to the marketing contractor. That ad circular, pushed into a mailbox (and read by the girl’s father) is another data flow, and one that’s not expected.

[…]

Everyone who works with data knows that data becomes much more powerful when it is combined with data from other sources. Data that seems innocuous, like a grocery store purchase history, can be combined with geographic data, medical data, and other kinds of data to characterize users and their behavior with great precision. Knowing whether a person purchases cigarettes can be of great interest to an insurance company, as can knowing whether a cardiac patient is buying bacon.

The article is written by and for data developers, primarily, and poses more questions than it can answer, especially around the thorny concept of data deletion. It’s an interesting read, but it left me wondering if those GDPR data protection principles will ever be fully put into practice.

Author: Terry Madeley

I work with student data and enjoy reading about art and design, data, education and technology.

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