GDPR is still a thing, right?

Some recent data protection stories that have caught my eye.

French data watchdog dishes out largest GDPR fine yet: Google ordered to hand over €50m
The French agency, CNIL, ruled today that the search giant had offered users inadequate information, spreading it across multiple pages, and had failed to gain valid consent for ads personalisation. […] The CNIL concluded that Google had breached the General Data Protection Regulation in two ways: by failing to meet transparency and information requirements, and failing to obtain a legal basis for processing.

Amazon, Apple and Google face data complaints
General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) rules say EU customers have the right to access a copy of the personal data companies hold about them. However, privacy group noyb said it found that most of the big streaming companies did not fully comply. It has filed formal complaints, which if upheld could result in large fines.

Google accused of GDPR privacy violations by seven countries
Consumer groups across seven European countries have filed GDPR complaints against Google’s location tracking (via Reuters). The European Consumer Organisation (BEUC), of which each of the groups are a member, claims that Google’s “deceptive practices” around location tracking don’t give users a real choice about whether to enable it, and that Google doesn’t properly inform them about what this tracking entails. If upheld, the complaints could mean a hefty fine for the search giant.

The NOYB organisation gets mentioned a number of times there.

Max Schrems: The privacy bubble needs to start ‘getting sh*t done’
After years locked in numerous long, drawn-out and often bitter legal battles, Schrems decided to launch a nonprofit aiming to help people bring their own consumer privacy cases to court.

The plan is for NOYB (None Of Your Business) to take advantage of the incoming European Union General Data Protection Regulation, which offers more options for collective redress across the bloc, and harness the momentum Schrems has built up with various high-profile court cases.

Seems to be working. (Via)

Author: Terry Madeley

I enjoy reading about art and design, culture, data, education, technology and the web. I'm confused by a lot of it, to be honest.

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