MI5’s poor surveillance data handling

It’s not often a data protection or records management news story gets this much press attention.

MI5 accused of unlawful handling of surveillance data
MI5 has been accused of “extraordinary and persistent illegality” for holding on to data obtained from members of the public. The human rights organisation Liberty has taken the security service to court over the way that it gathers and stores information under the Investigatory Powers Act.

MI5 ‘unlawfully’ handled bulk surveillance data, lawsuit reveals
“The documents show extraordinary and persistent illegality in MI5’s operations, apparently for many years,” said civil liberties organisation Liberty, which is bringing the case. “The existence of what MI5 itself calls ‘ungoverned spaces’ in which it holds and uses large volumes of private data is a serious failure of governance and oversight, especially when mass collection of data of innocent citizens is concerned.”

MI5’s use of personal data was ‘unlawful’, says watchdog
The security service MI5 has handled large amounts of personal data in an “undoubtedly unlawful” way, a watchdog has said. The Investigatory Powers Commissioner said information gathered under warrants was kept too long and not stored safely. Civil rights group Liberty said the breaches involved the “mass collection of data of innocent citizens”. The high court heard MI5 knew about the issues in 2016 but kept them secret.

Liberty’s challenge to UK state surveillance powers reveals shocking failures
The challenge, by rights group Liberty, led last month to an initial finding that MI5 had systematically breached safeguards in the UK’s Investigatory Powers Act (IPA) — breaches the Home Secretary, Sajid Javid, euphemistically couched as “compliance risks” in a carefully worded written statement that was quietly released to parliament.

This was first reported last month …

MI5 slapped on the wrist for ‘serious’ surveillance data breach
Home Secretary Sajid Javid has confessed to Parliament that MI5 bungled the security of “certain technology environments used to store and analyse data,” including that of ordinary Britons spied on by the agency. In a lengthy Parliamentary statement made last week, Javid obliquely admitted that spies had allowed more people to help themselves to its treasure troves of data on British citizens than was legally allowed.

Sajid Javid admits MI5 committed serious safeguard breaches
In a written statement to parliament last week that was not widely noticed, Javid said he was notifying MPs of “compliance risks MI5 identified and reported within certain technology environments used to store and analyse data, including material obtained under the Investigatory Powers Act”.

… but now the story has been picked up by everyone, including the Middle East Eye

UK’s MI5 spy agency handled surveillance data unlawfully, court hears
An internal agency review warned more than three years ago that storage systems may have become “ungoverned spaces”, which would mean that they were operating in breach of both UK and European law. Despite this, MI5 continued to build new electronic storage systems which did not allow the agency to review its contents and decide what material should be deleted, as the law requires. The problems were withheld from the official watchdog, the Investigatory Powers Commissioner, until earlier this year, the High Court was told.

… and even Russia Today and Sputnik News are getting in on it.

‘Extraordinary & persistent illegality’: UK’s MI5 accused of mishandling bulk surveillance data
MI5 has no control of its storage of vast volumes of people’s calls, messages, web browsing history, as well as other personal data that the agency has managed to obtain on the basis of surveillance warrants, which were often issued under false pretext, the High Court heard on Tuesday in a legal challenge brought by the human rights organization Liberty.

Outcry as High Court finds MI5 engaged in ‘unlawful’ storage, handling of bulk surveillance
Ten internal documents from senior MI5 officials, including an 11 March letter from director Sir Andrew Parker, revealed significant non-compliance issues in how citizens’ data had been kept and used, including a subsequent cover-up of internal failures and that “data might be being held in ungoverned spaces in contravention of our policies”.

Let’s hope some good comes from all this.

Setting precedents for privacy: the UK legal challenges bringing surveillance into the open
These debates highlight the importance of collective efforts to assert respect for privacy and other rights as a core part of public life. We are on the cusp of a positive shift in power towards open public debate and accountability about data and the way it is used against us.

Author: Terry Madeley

I enjoy reading about art and design, culture, data, education, technology and the web. I'm confused by a lot of it, to be honest.

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