Automated yet playful

Two recent interviews with contemporary generative artists.

The generative portraiture of Espen Kluge
I love Kluge’s description of his organic coding process for creating art. It flies in the face of the popular misconception that programming art is somehow a linear process, when in actuality, it is almost always circuitous.

When I asked Kluge if he is still surprised by the outputs he is getting, he replied:

Oh, yeah, I wouldn’t have the motivation to do this at all if I wasn’t surprised every time. It’s a pleasure every time I get close to something I like. I don’t have a good drawing hand. This is something I use to be my drawing hand. Sometimes the lines and shapes can be really beautiful, and I don’t think I could calculate that. It’s impossible for me to have these things in my head before I start. I would like to think this is true for all generative artists. It is a very playful process.

automated-and-playful

LIA, software art pioneer and the fluidity of code
Austrian artist LIA is considered one of the pioneers of digital art and has been producing works since 1995. She is one of the very few women pioneers in software and net art. Her practice spans across video, performance, software, installation, sculpture, projections, and digital applications …

Your work using creative code becomes a generative work in real time, introducing the concept of “fluid” as opposed to the formality of the written code that requires engineered precision? Can you give some examples of this?

I started as an autodidact, so at the beginning, I had no idea about how to write “clean” code. This led to a variety of interesting results that I had not planned upfront. After more than two decades of programming, now I know how to write code properly, but I still like to keep the process of programming open to all sorts of possible errors, being able to go into different directions from any point onwards. That means I am not planning every step ahead, but rather “going with the flow”. The artworks themselves are constantly changing, either because they are of generative nature or because someone might be interacting with them. There is no start and no end, they just evolve over time over and over again.

automated-and-playful-2

Silver ratio
In her practice, LIA translates concepts into formally written structures that, in turn, generate an output through a ‘machine’. The artistic experience contrasts with the formality of the written code. LIA’s work takes up traditions of drawing and painting and connects these with the aesthetics of digital image worlds and the language of algorithms.

See more of LIA’s work on Sedition.

Author: Terry Madeley

I enjoy reading about art and design, culture, data, education, technology and the web. I'm confused by a lot of it, to be honest.

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