Perhaps I should give street photography another go

streetMing Thein has a great post on petapixel on the ethics of photographing random strangers on the street and, as you’d expect, they are some wonderful shots throughout. It was interesting to read about some of the different techniques that can be used. I can’t remember where I first heard the line “If your photo’s not good enough, you’re not close enough”, but Ming has another way too.

There’s a slight snobbishness about shooting with a longer lens, too – it isn’t seen as being hardcore enough. In fact, these days, it seems if you’re not at f/8, hyperfocal distance and sticking your camera and flash right up to somebody’s nose, then you’re not really doing street photography.

There’s another approach, though. I think it’s much, much harder to shoot wide open with a relatively wide lens – say nothing longer than 35mm – and shoot without your subject knowing you’re there. This is what I like to call the stealth method – you don’t want to draw attention to yourself, and better yet, shoot without even bringing the camera to your eye.

I’d love to give this a proper go. It’s easier to blend in and look inconspicuous with a cameraphone than with a big lens perhaps, but the one I’ve got now isn’t up to much. I sense a post-Christmas shopping opportunity!

Does technology determine prose style?

The start of an essay entitled The Author Signal: Nietzsche’s Typewriter and Medium Theory

The condition of possibility created by a particular medium forms an important part of the theoretical foundations of medium theory, which questions the way in which medial changes lead to epistemic changes. This has become an important area of inquiry in relation to the differences introduced by computation and digital media, more generally.

As impenetrable as that sounds, I’m very much looking forward to reading this properly – something else that takes me back to those Newport days.

(Via The Browser)

Never thought about chairs this much before

Colin McSwiggen explains why he’s so against chairs. I have to admit to not giving them a second thought, other than the times at work when my recline lever slips and I end up suddenly horizontal. The problems seem much deeper than temperamental office furniture though.

Against Chairs
I hate to piss on the party, but chairs suck. All of them. No designer has ever made a good chair, because it is impossible. Some are better than others, but all are bad. Not only are chairs a health hazard, they also have a problematic history that has inextricably tied them to our culture of status-obsessed individualism. Worse still, we’ve become dependent on them and it’s not clear that we’ll ever be free.

History, ergonomics, politics, it’s all in there.

And here’s another take on the chair, which I guess backs up his point. Make of it what you will.

Self-Sustainable Chair 2

Fourteen years of pantone colors-of-the-year (tecznotes)

Fourteen years of pantone colors-of-the-year (tecznotes)
“I love the language patterns in press releases that accompany annual announcements, like Pantone’s Color Of The Year. Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute, has been providing adjectives and free-associating since 1999. Between 9/11 and the economy, a lot of political freight gets bundled into these packages as well—“concern about the economy” is first mentioned in late 2005 (sand dollar).”

Colossal Organic Wooden Sculptures by Henrique Oliveira

Colossal Organic Wooden Sculptures by Henrique OliveiraIncredible transformation of a material normally thought of as straight, solid, rigid, dependable. These massive sculptures from Henrique Oliveira, consisting of a very natural material, feel anything but; threatening, almost. When Botany attacks! PhotosMore photos.

Five reasons to still use a typewriter

Following on from that earlier The Last Typewriter article from the BBC, here’s another of theirs, on why we should still use them. I was expecting this to be a little flippant but I liked its take on the generational issue: “while ‘older folks’ resist technology, the youngest missed the original typewriter experience, hence the interest now.” You remember the iPad typewriter thing I mentioned earlier, right?

Five reasons to still use a typewriter

So. Farewell then, typewriter

UglyA sad day perhaps, but if we’re being honest, those modern typewriters look bloody awful. The BBC article talks of typewriters holding “a special place in the hearts of members of the public”, but I’m guessing that applies to only certain typewriters and certain generations of the public. I loved the ones I had, but can not imagine, as a student, say, completing a dissertation with one. I know others did, but jeez, can you imagine?

Beautiful Old-time Typewriters

Ok, so whilst they don’t have internet and getting new ribbons for them is a pain, they look so much nicer than this plasticy rectangle of bland laptop. Really wish I had kept my Underwood now. Though actually, I think I still have that Remington in the cellar.

Beautiful Old-time Typewriters – http://www.shootingfilm.net

Technoetic Art

Art is stationary conventionally. We can read it from a work of art, be it a painting, a sculpture or a drama. Technoetic art stresses interaction. You can interact with the environment, the painting and the sculpture. Our movements are making changes on them. No stationary works exist as long as there is interaction. Visitors and users are all involved in the creating of these works, whether the works are in words or in pictures. This represents a major innovation in art.

Roy Ascott on technoetic art — A Unique Monkey King Created by Father of Technoetic Arts Professor Roy Ascott

19th-Century Mathematical Illustrations of Consciousness

19th-Century Mathematical Illustrations of Consciousness

Simply cannot think of a more intriguing headline. I could quite easily reblog all these Brain Pickings articles, but this one in particular caught my eye. Imagine, being able to actually see–let alone draw–consciousness. Benjamin Betts thought he could.

Antique typewriters converted to keyboards

Love this, being a big fan of antique typewriters. You can either buy an antique typewriter already converted or just the kit to convert your own. The Underwood was my favourite. They’re heavy buggers, them. I think I’ve still got my old Remington though. Might give this a go.

Antique typewriters converted to keyboards enpundit.com