Speaking of punctuation

Following on from that punctuation post just then, here are a few more:

andorpersand

I’m finding the dictation feature on my new phone very handy, but even though it supports a whole range of spoken punctuation marks and “new line” and “all caps” and all that, it seems to be struggling with Andorpersand, Hedera and Love Point. Shame.

Type the Sky

Type the sky

“Standing in something like a little courtyard in Barcelona I looked up. I saw houses, the sky, clouds and a “Q”. The negative space in-between the houses formed a letter. I loved the idea of the sky as words, the negative being the positive. If I could find a “Q” other letters should be somewhere around the corner.”

http://jpgmag.com/stories/1216

Electrocuting wood

Now, electrocuting wood isn’t something that happens every day, so if someone came up to you and asked you what that would look like, you’d probably say something like, “Er, I don’t know, perhaps like, er, slow brown lightning or something? Something fractally? Perhaps mirroring the patterns of the wood’s original branches or roots or something? And then, perhaps, when two branches or lightning paths meet, they kind of get bigger? More like dark brown, clotted varicose veins or something, like out of The Thing, maybe?”

And you know what, you’d be right.

Rethinking colour

Wandering round exp.lore.com has led to some re-evaluation of how I thought about colour. Turns out I’ve got some basic things wrong.

Update: Speaking of colour, Colossal have found some great aerial photos of tulip fields in the Netherlands. All the colours seem well represented there, without any wavelength issues…

In(ter)activity

interactivitySpeaking as an Interactive Arts graduate (who’s obviously putting his degree to very good use in his career, <ahem>), this Onion article really struck a chord and had me shouting “Yes! Exactly!” at the screen over and over again.

Internet users demand less interactivity
‘We Just Want To Visit Websites And Look At Them,’ Users Say

Tired of being bombarded with constant requests to share content on social media, bestow ratings, leave comments, and generally “join in on the discussion,” the nation’s Internet users demanded substantially less interactivity this week. […]

Speaking with reporters, web users expressed a near unanimous desire to visit a website and simply look at it, for once, without having every aspect of the user interface tailored to a set of demographic information culled from their previous browsing history. In addition, citizens overwhelmingly voiced their wish for a straightforward one-way conduit of information, and specifically one that did not require any kind of participation on their part. […]

“Every time I type a web address into my browser, I don’t need to be taken to a fully immersive, cross-platform, interactive viewing experience,” said San Diego office manager Keith Boscone. “I don’t want to take a moment to provide my feedback, open a free account, become part of a growing online community, or see what related links are available at various content partners.”

“All I want is to go to a website, enjoy it for the time I’ve decided to spend there, and then move on with my life,” he continued. “Is that so much to ask?” […]

In addition to demanding less interactivity, Internet users requested fewer links and clickable icons connected to social media outlets through which they could email, share, tweet, pin, blog, or re-blog content. Many said that when they did come across something they found interesting or amusing, nine times out of 10 they just wanted to keep it to themselves.

“Don’t always ask me to send everything I’ve read to everyone I know. And by the same token, I don’t need to know if they’ve read the same thing. That information means nothing to either of us,” said Glendale, AZ shopkeeper Dan Allenby, who could not think of a single instance where it would be helpful to sign into another website through his Facebook account. “If I wanted to tell someone about something, I’ll just tell them individually. Or better yet, they’ll stumble across it on their own.”

The header image for the article is great, just people reading the web, but sat next to it are the obligatory share-this-with-everyone buttons showing some impressive scores, so whilst it’s hitting a nerve with me, there are plenty of others on the other side of the in(ter)activity fence.

Genetic portraits

split-face-portraits2      split-face-portraits3      split-face-portraits1

Wonderful sets of family portraits, with a difference, from Canada-based photographer and graphic designer Ulric Collette. He and his son appear in the third photo above.

The parent/child portraits look very startling, but the brother and sister pairs could very easily be photos of real people. Must have a go at this myself…

And here’s some more of Ulric’s mad portrait work.

(Via 123 Inspiration)

Cinemagraphs

Cinemagraphs are, according to Wikipedia, “still photographs in which a minor and repeated movement occurs. Cinemagraphs, which are usually published in an animated GIF format, can give the illusion that the viewer is watching a video.”

Am I right in thinking this is an internet-only thing? Is this a branch of photography that couldn’t have existed when I was at art college?

Where old cars went to die

deadcarsNothing’s permanent, of course, but not many things shuffle off this mortal highway so gracefully as these old Belgian bangers.

“The large ‘car cemetery’ is located in the village of Chatillon,located in Belgium. In Second World War the world faced much losses.one of the losses are cars. Yes there are more than 500 cars in one places are become corrosive. The reason was more expensive for shift throw Ocean. So cars left in the forest. Somebody like to prevent this models from cemeteries. whoever car lovers enjoy this collection”

(Via Design You Trust. More photos at Mail Online.)

An Alaska Window

alaskawindowIt may be another simple-thing-building-up-into-something-interesting-through-daily-repetition art project, but I like the calm meditative feel of Mark Meyers’ An Alaska Window.

I live in Alaska in a log house that’s about 100 years old. It has these interesting, old (though not energy efficient), single-paned sash windows. They are at the foot of my bed and are normally the first thing I see in the morning. I noticed over the years that they are constantly changing with the weather and seasons, occasionally in interesting ways. They ice up in the winter, collect leaves in the fall, and occasionally steam up in the summer. So I started taking photos of them and the scene outside—mostly with the iPhone, but occasionally I’ll lug the dSLR up there. It has gradually turned into a minimalist personal project that’s become a reminder to myself that even the simplest things are interesting if you pay attention. I’ve found it to be good way to start each day, an exercise in seeing and visually exploring a single subject and noticing how it gradually changes over time.

(Via Petapixel)

Like seasonal crop circles

simonbecksnowartWe’ve all heard of crop circles, but how about something a little more seasonal? Colossal has a collection of photos from Simon Beck who, since 2004, “has strapped on a pair of snowshoes and lumbered out into the the freshly fallen snow at the Les Arcs ski resort in France to trample out his distinctly geometric patterns, footprint by footprint. Each work takes the 54-year-old artist anywhere between 6 hours and two days to complete, an impressive physical feat aided from years of competitive orienteering.”