Category Archives: Misc.

Kaizen, change on the cheap?

Key features of Kaizen include:

  • Improvements are based on many small changes rather than the radical changes that might arise from Research and Development
  • As the ideas come from the workers themselves, they are less likely to be radically different, and therefore easier to implement
  • Small improvements are less likely to require major capital investment than major process changes
  • The ideas come from the talents of the existing workforce, as opposed to using research, consultants or equipment – any of which could be very expensive
  • All employees should continually be seeking ways to improve their own performance
  • It helps encourage workers to take ownership for their work, and can help reinforce team working, thereby improving worker motivation.
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continual_improvement_process

I was trying to remember the name of this technique when talking about change management with a colleague earlier. I like the idea of everyone being on the look-out, in an energetic, proactive way, for ways of improving how they do things — and I guess the first step in that might be to encourage people to moan about their jobs, to identify the parts of the process that feel unwieldy, unnecessary, over-complex — but I’m wondering if it’s not just change on the cheap, as those bulletpoints above from Wikipedia might imply.

The elegant secret to self-discipline

1) Recognize that right now already is the future. You are currently experiencing the future of all your Past Selves. Their choices have come to fruition. If you would like better fruits, make your Right Now Self into someone who, as a habit, rolls out the red carpet for Future Self. Imagine if someone had already done that for you. Highly disciplined people are always experiencing advantages inherited from their wise and caring Past Selves.

2) Recognize the moments when you’re about to sell out your Future Self.

http://www.raptitude.com/2013/10/the-elegant-secret-to-self-discipline/

A new personal productivity blog that might actually be useful

I’m always wary of personal productivity blogs. I love the topic but they become just another thing to read when I should be working. But WorkSmart seems different, like it might actually be useful.

"But what about the people working behind those services, who are having to use systems which aren’t quite so delightfully designed with the user in mind? The systems and processes we are all engaged with on a daily basis when we are at work often suck, and make our jobs a lot harder than they need to be."

http://worksmarthq.com/welcome-to-worksmart/

Check, plan, do

check plan do

http://stuhere.blogspot.co.uk/2013/01/systems-thinking-summary-check-plan-do.html

Stuart Johnson has a good summary of Systems Thinking – which I’m guessing is A Thing now – and how it could be applied in a university careers/employability setting. I’m fighting, unsuccessfully, the temptation to write that surely this is all simply common sense?

Important: how to write a to-do list

"You have a limited number of decision-making ‘points’. Starting your day with an unprioritized to-do list can also undermine your ability to make productive decisions as the day goes on. Ego depletion refers to the amount of decision-making ‘points’ we have. As we use up our points our ability to make “smart” decisions becomes impaired"

https://medium.com/better-humans/77800bb2c788

Saving the lost art of conversation

"Her methods are contagious; once you start noticing what Turkle notices, you can’t stop. It’s a beautiful day, and we walk past boutiques, restaurants, and packed sidewalk cafés. The data are everywhere: The pair of high-school-age girls walking down Boylston Street, silent, typing. The table of brunchers ignoring their mimosas (and one another) in favor of their screens. The kid in the stroller playing with an iPad. The sea of humans who are, on this sparkling Saturday, living up to Turkle’s lament—they seem to be, indeed, alone together."

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2014/01/the-eavesdropper/355727/#