Unreal art around town

At a time when indoor art galleries and museums are closed because of you know what, it’s good to see some alternative initiatives. Here, an augmented reality app allowed you to explore 36 digital sculptures from artists around the world, arranged as a riverside walking tour.

How an augmented reality app transformed London into an immersive art galleryAeon Videos
If you ever hopped on the Pokémon GO craze, you’ll have an inkling of how digital technology is increasingly capable of adding rich new slices to everyday life. The public exhibition ‘Unreal City’, which ran from 8 December 2020 to 5 January 2021 on the River Thames in London – and is, until 9 February 2021, available for at-home viewing – similarly superimposed digital layers on to reality, but with an aim to transform the city into an immersive augmented reality (AR) art gallery.

Have a go at curating your own exhibition at home.

Unreal City at HomeAcute Art
Acute Art and Dazed Media are excited to announce that Unreal City, London’s biggest public festival of AR art will now be available to view and interact with from inside your home for one-month only. Responding to new lockdown measures and the popularity of the exhibition in London and across the United Kingdom, Acute Art and Dazed Media will make these site-specific artworks available for audiences all around the world to discover from the safety of their homes via the free Acute Art app.

Take it easy

Remember Florentijn Hofman’s gigantic rubber duck in Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbour some years ago? Something else is floating about there now.

KAWS floats a massive inflatable sculpture in Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbour
The reclined, monochrome figure is the largest to date for the American artist, with recent previous iterations of the project installed at the Chiang Kai Shek Memorial Hall in Taipei, Taiwan, and on Seokchon Lake in Seoul, South Korea. The figure was purposefully designed to be in a peaceful repose, its crossed-out eyes gazing at the sky above.

“I was thinking of all the tension in the world, and I wanted to create work that would make people think about relaxing,” KAWS recently told TIME. “And there’s nothing more relaxing than lying on your back in water and looking up at the sky.

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It’s can’t be that relaxing for the organisers, though.

A giant KAWS sculpture will float in Hong Kong’s harbor
The 10-day waterborne installation, set to begin March 22nd, is the latest stop for a touring exhibition of the giant sculpture to different Asian cities, dubbed “KAWS:HOLIDAY,” and organized by AllRightsReserved. The company put together other viral hits in Hong Kong’s main harbor, including Paulo Grangeon’s sleuth of 1,600 papier maché pandas and Florentijn Hofman’s giant rubber duck, which famously deflated in 2013. The KAWS sculpture will be anchored in the harbor by a metal base weighing 40 tons, with the project costing over HK$10 million ($1.3 million), according to the South China Morning Post.

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