So, what did you have for tea last night?

Felton Annual Report – a eulogy​
Nicholas Felton is able to sell 3,000 of his reports that show his favorite beer and quirks for $30.00 a piece. We couldn’t give away an education report–one of the most important topics–for free to the public. Clearly, we needed a new approach.

Yep, I’ve bought some of those $30 reports and regularly refer back to them. A shame there won’t be any more, but who’s to say what’s next for him.

Here’s another article on his reports, and the changes that have taken place over the 10 years he’s been doing them.

10 years in the making, Nicholas Felton files his final Feltron Report
Over this span, Felton’s commitment to his own data collection resembled an exercise in self-torture. He’s worn noisy pedometers that clicked every time he took a step, built his own iPhone app to bug him through the day to ask what he was up to, spent a year documenting every single conversation he had, and even, at one point, found himself weighing a three-year-old’s birthday cake to track his eating habits.​

Nicholas Felton's new app, Reporter

reporter

Nicholas Felton, the man behind the Feltron Reports and Daytum, has a new app out, Reporter. He says on his blog

“Reporter’s random prompts to answer a survey had made tracking the year a breeze and helped me to investigate questions that would have been impossible to answer using other methods. I was interested in who I spent time with, but to track this in an ongoing basis is a full-time job. I added questions for what I was wearing, eating or drinking and if I was working or not… and we streamlined the process to ensure that a report only took seconds to answer. We also added in background sampling to get information from the phone on the weather, my location and the ambient noise level.”

I loved Daytum and at one point was using it quite extensively. I wanted to use it to track which of my ties are my favourites, but couldn’t find a way of neatly naming them (the blue-ish purple-ish TM Lewin one, the more regimented gold-ish Van Buck one). I can’t see this new app helping with that question especially, but it’ll be fun to do the quantified self thing again for a while.

Still quantifying ourselves?

daytumapp

Didn’t realise I’d been away from Daytum for so long.

For those that don’t know, and why should you, bloody hell, Daytum was part of a trend on the web some time back for personal data tracking, the ‘quantified self’. Here’s a post from Wired about it, from 2009:

Know Thyself: Tracking Every Facet of Life, from Sleep to Mood to Pain, 24/7/365
Numbers are making their way into the smallest crevices of our lives. We have pedometers in the soles of our shoes and phones that can post our location as we move around town. We can tweet what we eat into a database and subscribe to Web services that track our finances. There are sites and programs for monitoring mood, pain, blood sugar, blood pressure, heart rate, cognitive alacrity, menstruation, and prayers. … All this might once have seemed like a nightmare … But two years ago, my fellow Wired writer Kevin Kelly and I noticed that many of our acquaintances were beginning to do this terrible thing to themselves, finding clever ways to extract streams of numbers from ordinary human activities.

Daytum, developed by Nicholas Feltron (of the well known Feltron reports) and Ryan Case, Daytum allows you to easily capture and categorise small bits of information, and then present these in quite interesting, visual ways with the aim of providing a little insight into how we live our lives. For a while, all the way back in 2009, I was tracking how much coffee I got through, what I was reading, which were my favourite ties, that kind of thing.

I don’t know what made me think of Daytum again, but I thought I’d catch up with it again.

Its blog, however, ends with this post from April 11:

Moving West
We’re thrilled to announce today that we just started a new phase of our careers: we’ve moved to California to join the product design team at Facebook.

and the last tweet from the @daytum Twitter account is:

Doesn’t bode well, but then, just the other week coincidentally, this one from founder Nicholas Feltron:

So perhaps there might be some life left in it yet?

And I’ve forgotten all about your.flowingdata.com too. But that, like Daytum and much of the quantifying self scene, seems to have gone a little quiet.