Protecting library privacy

You are not what you read: librarians purge user data to protect privacy
“I was approached years ago at a different library about users who’d checked out certain astrological books,” said Thistlethwaite. The NYPD officer told her he was looking for the Zodiac killer. “Most police investigations are a little smarter than that, but sometimes they’re just not.”

Seems pretty clear to me: ​one of the principles in the Data Protection Act is that data should not be kept longer than is necessary. Admittedly this is a news article from the US, where there’s no direct equivalent of the DPA, but still.

On owning your own data

On owning your own data
The problem, of course, is this wretched business model that has your landlord snooping on you and keeping all that information in the first place. If they didn’t have that information — or if that information was encrypted in a manner that only you could access it — they couldn’t share your information even if they wanted to.

Why Groklaw shut down

Groklaw, Pamela Jones’s website reporting on legal issues around the Free and Open Source Software community, closed down and she herself wants to “get off of the Internet to the degree it’s possible.” Loss of privacy, forced exposure, the dehumanising nature of total surveillance: issues I’ve been vaguely aware of recently, but never really thought about seriously. Her post explaining why she’s shut down her blog is the first thing I’ve read that I’ve understood, I think, with all this.

“Anyway, one resource was excerpts from a book by Janna Malamud Smith, ‘Private Matters: In Defense of the Personal Life’, and I encourage you to read it. I encourage the President and the NSA to read it too. I know. They aren’t listening to me. Not that way, anyhow. But it’s important, because the point of the book is that privacy is vital to being human, which is why one of the worst punishments there is is total surveillance.”

http://www.groklaw.net/article.php?story=20130818120421175

Do people really care about personal data?

Do people really care about personal data?
Privacy is difficult to understand as long as it’s presented as an abstract concept. But to those teenagers, the desire to talk to their friends without their parents or teachers knowing everything that’s said is not at all abstract. Similarly, all consumers care very much about the practical effects of today’s centralised data warehouses, such as wasting time dealing with bureaucracy that makes it hard to change the phone number on an account. They care about bad credit histories, misdirected post, and the failure to get what they want. They care when they discover that the photograph they thought they deleted was only hidden from view but has remained in the site’s database, where it has been automatically recognised, reused, and added to profiles that have been sold to advertisers or become the subject of a government applied court order. They care about being erroneously placed on no-fly lists because an online “friend” once watched a terrorist video and feeling that their personal relationships are a commodity.

Privacy, iPads, art student satisfaction

What day is it? It’s Data Privacy Day!
Take a moment and think about what Google knows about you. Correspondence and contacts via email, schedule via calendar, interest via feed reader, purchases via Checkout, and most importantly your day-to-day via search. How do you feel about a single company knowing that much about you? Don’t you want to know how they use all that data and more importantly, how they protect it?

Diagnosing the tablet fever in higher education
Tablet-style computers could be game-changers for colleges, bringing in a new era of classroom collaboration and pushing the adoption of electronic textbooks over a tipping point. Today’s announcement by Apple Inc. of the iPad tablet has education watchers predicting a wave of student purchases, major textbook publishers rejoicing, and at least one college saying it will consider giving them to all incoming students. But wait — it might be time to take a deep breath to let the excitement of the sales pitch fade.

Academics in art and design have drawn up a plan to tackle stubbornly low scores for student satisfaction in the National Student Survey
[D]espite efforts to improve the ratings, art and design still does not perform well in comparison with other subject areas, according to a forthcoming report, I Can’t Believe It’s Not Better: The Paradox of NSS Scores for Art and Design. […] The widely held view was that the pedagogy of art and design subjects, where students are encouraged to explore and navigate their own way through projects with support, was poorly served by NSS questions, which were felt to relate more to subjects with a highly timetabled, often lecture-based, structure.