Mobile media minefield

The Guardian’s technology ‘agony aunt’ responding to a parent who has a problem with her 14-year-old son’s use of social media.

How can I control my child’s social media use?
The government recognises the risks of being online, but still hasn’t implemented roughly half the recommendations in Dr Tanya Byron’s report, Safer Children in a Digital World, released 10 years ago. And as she has just pointed out at the NSPCC, Instagram, SnapChat and WhatsApp didn’t even exist in 2008.

[…]

If you take these routes, you may be in for an extended game of Whac-A-Mole. It would be better to work towards a negotiated social solution, rather than a technological one.

It’s a minefield all right. We prefer the ‘negotiated social solution’ with our young teenagers, and we make sure as a family we’re all aware of the latest e-safety issues. We try our best to create an open atmosphere at home, rather than anything too heavy-handed, so that they can share with us any concerns they may have with anything they might see or read.

And here’s that NSPCC update from Tanya Byron.

Ten years since the Byron Review – Are children safer in the digital world?
This document reviews the 38 recommendations made in the Byron Review “Safer Children in a Digital World” and discusses how these were implemented. It also considers the influence of political change and online developments in the past decade, in order to contextualise the changes we’re trying to bring about to keep children and young people safe online in 2018.

Modern romance?

Who’d want to be young, these days? It’s far too confusing.

Instagram handles have replaced phone numbers
And while it may seem like handing out your phone number is a much more of a privacy concern than a social media handle, it’s worth noting the amount of highly personal information the latter conveys. Unlike a number, your Instagram profile is often attached to your first and last name, and exists in relation to your various other social media accounts. It has countless photos of you, your friends, and gives a stranger a distinctively personal look into your life. What’s more, unlike a phone number, it can’t be faked to appease an aggressively pushy creep.

And then, if you want to make a go of it, there’s this.

Social media addicts have a new way to propose with this engagement phone case
Once you propose, you’ll either have a memory you and your future spouse will want to look fondly on for years to come (and post all over Facebook at every opportunity, along with your future baby photos, meals, vacations and blurry sunsets) or a spectacularly masochistic play-by-play of the moment your heart was broken.

I’m glad I’m old (-fashioned?).

Pernicious Facebook

There’s a Pernicious Anaemia page on Facebook, but not an actual Pernicious Facebook page. Perhaps I should start one. I’m sure George Soros would give me a like.

George Soros: Facebook and Google a menace to society
“Mining and oil companies exploit the physical environment; social media companies exploit the social environment,” said the Hungarian-American businessman, according to a transcript of his speech. “This is particularly nefarious because social media companies influence how people think and behave without them even being aware of it. This has far-reaching adverse consequences on the functioning of democracy, particularly on the integrity of elections.”

There’s more from him on his webpage. (I’m guessing he doesn’t have a Facebook page.)

George Soros: Remarks delivered at the World Economic Forum
Something very harmful and maybe irreversible is happening to human attention in our digital age. Not just distraction or addiction; social media companies are inducing people to give up their autonomy. The power to shape people’s attention is increasingly concentrated in the hands of a few companies. It takes a real effort to assert and defend what John Stuart Mill called “the freedom of mind.” There is a possibility that once lost, people who grow up in the digital age will have difficulty in regaining it. This may have far-reaching political consequences. People without the freedom of mind can be easily manipulated.

You wouldn’t think those in charge of these social media companies would agree, but perhaps they do?

‘Never get high on your own supply’ – why social media bosses don’t use social media
“It’s possible that in 20 years we’ll look back at the current generation of children and say: ‘Look, they are socially different from every other generation of humans that came before and as a result this is a huge problem and maybe we need to regulate these behaviours.’ Or perhaps we’ll look back and say: ‘I don’t know what the fuss was – I’m not sure why we were so concerned.’ Until we have some evidence, until there’s something that seems tangible, I think it’s going to be very hard to get people en masse to change how they behave.”

Ambivalent, to say the least.

Spinning like lonely stars indeed

Grant Smithies is lost in cyber-space
Here, my friends, is an addiction of the worst possible kind: A scourge on polite society that wastes the body and fries the brain. While seemingly harmless, social media is powerfully habit-forming. Within no time, the user becomes hopelessly hooked on gossip, recycled jokes and pop culture detritus, and begins to crave daily doses of dot-camaraderie with their online “friends” or “followers”. Rather than seeking flesh-and-blood interactions in the physical world, they spin like lonely stars through a vast digital galaxy swirling with trivia, wondering how they might best contribute to the communal pool of inanity.

Oh cheer up #ffs!

If composers had Facebook: Mozart's profile

Mozart on Facebook

"Statistically, people who’ve ‘liked’ Mozart on Facebook have a higher IQ. It got us thinking… what would Mozart ‘like’ on Facebook? And what would his profile look like?! On the tenth anniversary of the social network’s launch, we’ve imagined what the composer might have posted online throughout his life."

http://www.classicfm.com/composers/mozart/guides/mozart-facebook-profile/

I loved that they painted Beethoven as a needy youngster in that. We (I) always picture Mozart being the young buck and Beethoven the grumpy old man, but of course it wasn’t like that, chronologically.

Nothing lasts forever

A great line in here about how kids think of Facebook in the same way as we do about Linked In.

Why teens are tiring of Facebook
Facebook has become a social network that’s often too complicated, too risky, and, above all, too overrun by parents to give teens the type of digital freedom they crave.

And on we go.

So. Farewell then, App.net

app-netI’ve decided to cancel my app.net subscription. In the little please-tell-us-why-you’re-leaving box I put something about not feeling geeky or technie enough to feel I belong there.

I like their we-are-selling-our-product-not-our-users thing, and I really loved the founder’s podcast about business models and Instagram’s recently difficulties, but I just don’t feel that I’m getting enough out of the service to justify the cost. I don’t have a smart phone with which to experiment with all the apps, I’m not especially social with my social media and I wouldn’t recognise json if he hit me with an argonaut. There are only a few people I follow there anyway, and Google Reader will still help me catch what they’re saying and follow any of their links to anything interesting.

So I’m sticking with Twitter, though no idea why. I’m sure I’ve written about that before. And Facebook too, I guess, though this tweet from @nickbilton sums things up quite well.

Owner occupier

I increasingly feel like this is the only place on the internet I really own. The place I’m sure of. Twitter, Instagram etc feel like places that could be snatched away at somebody’s whim. Which would, sort of, be fine but, sort of, be not. I’m backing them up like I’m backing this up. But the files without the social context would be a little thin.

A post from Russell Davies carrying on that Personal Cloud line of thought.

Russell Group universities use social media, but don't we all now?

A post from Brian Kelly on the extent to which Russell Group universities are linking to social media sites, in attempts to ‘connect’ with their potential students, I guess.

Links to Social Media Sites on Russell Group University Home Pages
In a recent post in which I gave my predictions for 2012 I predicted that “Social networking services will continue to grow in importance across the higher education sector“. But how will we be able to assess the accuracy of that prediction? One approach is to see if there are significant changes in the number of links to social media services from institutional home pages. The following survey provides a summary of links to social media services which are hosted on the institutional entry point for the 20 Russell Group universities.

The 20 universities are listed with their links to Facebook, Twitter, YouTube etc. I’m surprised that Oxford doesn’t have anything listed, given the success of its Mobile Oxford project.

As Brian says, it will be interesting to see how this develops over the year, whether more join in or whether the way these institutions use these media channels change. The university I work for has links to the main three on their homepage, but there’s no indication of how we’re using these services. Feels to me that universities are expected to be on Facebook and the rest; that’s the norm, the lowest baseline. Saying we’re on Facebook, and making a big deal out of it, feels a little like us shouting out, “Hey kids! Check us out – our library has computers in it!” It’s not what we have but what we do with it that might make a difference, perhaps?

Maybe that’s why Oxford doesn’t have anything on its homepage. It doesn’t need to.